“A Rich Man Is Nothing But A Poor Man With Money ” – W.C. Fields

 

TSX Ends Lower On Friday

Canada’s main stock index ended modestly lower on Friday as financial and natural resource shares lost ground, while concerns about escalating geopolitical tensions after a U.S. strike in Syria prompted a risk-off sentiment among investors. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index was down 30.05 points, or 0.19 per cent, at 15,667.13 shortly after the closing bell. Wall Street’s three major indexes edged lower on Friday to end well below session highs after a weaker-than-expected job report, a U.S. missile strike in Syria and comments by a key Federal Reserve official on the Fed’s plan to reduce its balance sheet. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 7.06 points, or 0.03 per cent, to 20,655.89, the S&P 500 lost 1.93 points, or 0.08 per cent, to 2,355.56 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 1.14 points, or 0.02 per cent, to 5,877.81.
The news of the U.S.-Syria attack sent global stocks lower when it was announced, with the S&P 500 futures index falling as much as 0.5 per cent. But most of the losses ebbed after U.S. officials described the attack as a one-off that would not lead to wider escalation. U.S. employers added about 98,000 jobs in March, the fewest since last May and well below economists’ expectation of 180,000, as bad weather hit hiring at construction sites. However, wage growth ticked up slightly and the unemployment rate fell. Oil prices rose on Friday, trading near a one-month high and closing the week up 3 per cent after the United States fired missiles at a Syrian government air base, raising concern that the conflict could spread in the oil-rich region.

 

Canada Gains 19,400 Jobs 

Canada’s labour market pumped out another 19,400 net jobs last month, with the vast majority of the new work being full-time. However, Statistics Canada’s job survey Friday also showed the bulk of those new positions were created in the category of self-employment, which can include people working for a family business without pay. The report found that while 95% of the new jobs created last month were full-time, 95% of them were also self-employed positions. The agency says the country’s unemployment rate crept up in March to 6.7% from 6.6% because more people were looking for work. Compared to a year earlier, the categories of full-time and part-time work have each increased 1.5%.
The country lost 2,400 positions in the services sector last month, but added 21,800 factory jobs thanks to the biggest month-to-month surge in manufacturing work since 2002. The manufacturing sector added 24,400 positions, mostly in Ontario and to a lesser degree in Alberta, to climb back up to the same level it was 12 months earlier. Still, compared to its peak in the early 2000s, the manufacturing sector has about 630,000 fewer jobs, a drop of 27%, Statistics Canada said. Alberta easily saw the biggest overall job boost among provinces, adding 20,700 full-time jobs last month. At the other end of the spectrum, Quebec shed 17,800 full-time positions.

 

BLOG LINKS 

Your Tax Return Checklists for 2016 Tax Year Preparation 

 

Sources: Bloomberg; Investment Executive; advisor.ca;