“A satisfied customer is the best business strategy of all” – Michael LeBoeuf

TSX Rises, Major US Indices Also Close Out the Week with Increases

The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index rose – on the back of rising oil – by 1.2% on Friday to close out the week at 15,582.04, but it wasn’t alone. The S&P 500 recorded a record-high close of 2,399.29, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.26% to finish at 21,006.94, and the Nasdaq Composite climbed to 6,100.76 to finish off the week.

Rising oil prices, as well as strong US jobs numbers, better-than-expected earnings calls, and unchanged interest rates, helped to buoy the US indices. The US added 211,000 nonfarm jobs in April, up from a modest March increase of 79,000.

Oil enjoyed a bump on the news that Russian and Saudi Arabia may be ready to extend supply cuts, joining OPEC. The Federal Reserve opted to stay the course without an increase at this time. According to Thomson Reuters data, investors put the odds of a June rate increase at 75%. Lastly, the earnings reports for the first quarter 2017 gave investors a confidence boost. The S&P 500 first quarter returns were their strongest since 2011, at an increase of 14.7%.

U.S. House of Representatives Passes American Health Care Act

The U.S. Congress narrowly voted in favour of repealing much of the Affordable Care Act, known also as “Obamacare”. The AHCA – coined “Trumpcare” – must still get through the Senate to be signed into law by President Trump. While many political analysts feel that the bill is likely to be voted down by the Senate, there is a chance that Trumpcare will come into effect.

The impact on U.S. markets remains to be seen, but markets were up on Friday after a mixed post-vote Thursday.

The Healthcare industry in the United States has been estimated to be about 1/6th of its economy, so such a vast overhaul would create waves throughout the entire economy. Should the bill come into law, the Healthcare industry would potentially stand to gain ground in the short term, due to an increased set of pre-existing conditions that could lead to denial of coverage.

Looking at the mid- to long-term, with the loss of coverage anticipated to be in the 24-million-person range, it is possible that Trumpcare would end up being a drag on the economy, as the uninsured may not be able to afford their healthcare bills, should they become ill.

Sources: Globe Advisor, New York Times

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