“Well Begun Is Half Done” – Aristotle

 

TSX Rallies On Resource Stocks

Canada’s main stock index rallied on the strength of resource stocks, but shares in BlackBerry plunged after its first-quarter sales failed to meet expectations. The S&P/TSX composite index advanced 99.66 points to 15,319.56, with the base metals and gold sectors leading the way. Blackberry shares dropped more than 12% after the company announced a profit of US$671 million in its latest quarter, despite revenue falling to US$235 million compared with US$400 million a year ago. In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average shed 2.53 points to 21,394.76. The S&P 500 edged up 3.80 points to 2,438.30, while the Nasdaq composite gained 28.56 points at 6,265.25. The Canadian dollar was trading 0.15 of a U.S. cent lower to an average price of US75.37¢. The August crude contract was up US27¢ at US$43.01 per barrel and the July natural gas contract advanced US4¢ at US$2.93 per mmBTU. The August gold contract gained US$7 at US$1,256.40 an ounce and the July copper contract added US3¢ at US$2.62 a pound.

 

Canada’s Most ‘Emotional’ Investors Revealed 

Do you ever wonder why some people seem more prone to making rash or emotional investment decisions? Well, a new survey reveals which groups are most likely to buy stocks based on headlines and hype. Conducted by Hennick Wealth Management, the survey of Canadian investors found that higher income earners ($75K – $150K+) were more likely to make an investment decision based on a ‘hunch’ or a tip from a friend. 11.8% of high income earners said they would buy a stock solely on a friend’s recommendation compared with just 5.3% of low-to-mid income earners ($0K-74K.)

Men (13.7%) were twice as likely to make emotional investments and buy stocks based on a hunch than women (7.5%). Men (34.2%) were also much more like to buy a stock based on the recommendation of a friend compared with women (27.8%). “Men seem particularly influenced by ‘insider advice’ from other males when investing,” said Adam Hennick of Hennick Wealth Management.  “If you do take investment advice for a friend, try to do it from your friends that have been successful in investing. This seems obvious, but sometimes our desire to act on a hot tip can overwhelm our logic. Ask yourself, is this a person who’s actually done financially well in investing, or someone who just talks a good game.”

All savvy investors know that making decisions based on emotions is a recipe for disaster, so it should come as no surprise that 22.7% of Canadians said they have regretted an investment decision they made that was based on emotion. A staggering 69.2% of men with a high income regretted making an investment decision based on a hunch or gut instinct.

Sources: Bloomberg; Investment Executive; advisor.ca