“This would be a much better world if more married couples were as deeply in love as they are in debt” – Earl Wilson

TSX Posts Modest Increase on the Week

The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index, helped by broad gains, finished up on Friday by 33.79 points (0.21 per cent) to finish the week at 16,108.09. For the week, it was up 0.7 per cent (87.93 points) over last Friday’s finish at 16,039.26.

The energy and financial sectors gained on Friday.

Gold prices jumped this week overall, although it fell on Friday by $4.90 USD per ounce to $1,287.30. The $11.70 USD per ounce was good for a 0.92 per cent week-over-week increase.

U.S. light crude oil closed at a two-year high mark of $58.95 USD per barrel, while Brent crude oil gained 31 cents USD to finish at $63.86 USD per barrel. OPEC countries have once again been dancing around a potential supply cut, but nothing has been set in stone.

The Loonie gained 2 basis points on Friday, and stood at 78.68 cents USD as of Friday at 3:03pm PST. On the week, the Loonie dropped 25 basis points from last Friday’s finish of 78.93 cents to the Greenback, a drop of 0.32 per cent.

U.S. Markets See Dow Jones, S&P 500 Break Mini-Losing Streaks; NASDAQ Jumps

Black Friday, the famous shopping day that immediately follows the U.S. Thanksgiving – and for all intents and purposes, signals the green light for holiday shopping – meant a half-session on Wall Street. All of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), S&P 500 and NASDAQ posted gains on Black Friday.

U.S. Thanksgiving Thursday saw three things: football, turkey and online shopping. According to Adobe Analytics, U.S. shoppers spent nearly $3 Billion online on Thursday.

Some heavyweight online retailers saw boosts on Friday, as optimism over the holiday shopping season is expected to bode well for 4th Quarter Earnings. Bricks & mortar stores with strong online presences fared quite well on Friday.

The Dow Jones rose 31.81 points (0.14 per cent) to finish at 23,557.99; the S&P 500 rose a modest 5.34 points (0.21 per cent) to finish at 2,602.42; the NASDAQ jumped 21.80 points (0.32 per cent) to settle at 6,889.16.

Lastly, the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), dropped to a 3-week low of 9.67.

Canadian Household Debt Levels Highest Amount 35 Developed & Developing Countries

According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Canada’s household debt ranks as the highest among 35 developed & developing countries that are monitored by the OECD. Read our blog post on the subject here.

Sources: Globe Advisor, Yahoo! Finance, Adobe Analytics, CNBC.com